Monthly Archives: October 2011

Habitus…

“For Bourdieu, the connection between capital and field is crucial.  He argues that ‘capital does not exist and function except in relation to a field. …Still, it is the habitus that plays a significant part in the uptake of capital … Continue reading

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Naming in New Zealand – Chinese

“The Chinese tradition is very different. The Chinese family name is traditionally something to be held in high regard, to be honoured and enshrined. Yet among the Chinese persons interviewed for this book, there are many instances when they lost … Continue reading

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Names in New Zealand – Maori

In a really lovely book, Manying Ip writes: “In the matter of family names, Maori tradition used to be rather flexible. Maori are in part defined in terms of whakapapa (genealogy) which is often related through oral traditions. When children … Continue reading

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Construction of a reader

“How do children’s texts resonate with present-day occurrences, construct an informed or an unaware reader, perform or elide historical and social critique, or ignite a reader’s historical consciousness?”[1] [1] Quoted in abstract on MLA, CLA official session December 2004, Philadelphia … Continue reading

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interconnections between bilingualism, identity and literacy

Jones-Diaz (2002) “argue that critical frameworks for understanding the interconnections between bilingualism, identity and literacy are necessary to investigate children’s experiences of languages and literacies in everyday social practices.” (Jones-Diaz (2002), p175) “In contrast to psycholinguistic theories, sociolinguistic theories focus … Continue reading

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Contexts of bilingualism…

“Perhaps the first thing to note about a bilingual upbringing is that it can take place in a much greater variety of contexts than a monolingual upbringing. Romaine (1995, pp. 183–5) sets out six possible situations in which children may … Continue reading

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Established theories of early childhood bilingualism are limited

“Established theories of early childhood bilingualism are limited in articulating the intersections between language retention, bilingual identity and biliteracy, particularly in early childhood, where young children’s identity formation is continuously changing and renegotiated.” (Jones-Diaz (2002), p179) “Martin-Jones and Bhatt… argue … Continue reading

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Obesity in children/ eating habits

Watching TV during meals results in greater intake of food… (108) Tysoe and Wilson suggest that “it may be beneficial to educate parents, not only about good nutrition for children but also about the factors in the FFE [Family Food Environment] that … Continue reading

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Potatoes – did you know…

“Australian data shows that around half of all children’s vegetable intake is potato and most of this is fried (46%) or has fat added (28%), raising its energy density and making it less ‘healthy’ (Campbell & Crawford, 2001).” (106) Ref: Julia Tysoe and … Continue reading

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Food education

“In the preschool age group, there are two major environments that are likely to affect eating behaviour—the ‘family food environment’ (FFE) and the ‘childcare centre food environment’ (CCFE). Research has established that the main factors in the FFE that influence children’s eating behaviour are food availability, … Continue reading

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