New Zealand’s failure to help children born into poor families

http://platform.twitter.com/widgets/hub.1326407570.html

“A global report has found that children’s reading abilities are tied more closely to their socio-economic backgrounds in New Zealand than in any other country.

The OECD 2011 Education at a Glance report, based on results from the Programme for International Student Assessment(PISA),implies that our schools are the worst in the world at helping students overcome the disadvantages of being born into poor families.”

I would posit that it’s not just schools involved in this process, but community groups (government organisations! Community classes – like adult literacy programmes!), etc. … pretty damning though!

Ref: Simon Collins  (2012) Divided Auckland: Schools reaching out to most vulnerable. New Zealand Herald Friday February 10, 2012 (online version: accessed 10th Feb 2012)

Also suggested were the following links: http://www.oecd.org/education

www.starpath.ac.nz  www.ahe.org.nz  http://bit.ly/zDGvxE

www.kidscounteducation.co.nz – a group supporting lower income families with early education (mentioned in the following article)

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
This entry was posted in early years education, Education in poverty, Literate Contexts, Parent and child, Understanding literacy. Bookmark the permalink.

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