Issues affecting ‘wise’ teaching practice and the implementation of Te Whariki

In an article admittedly now 10 years old, but still relevant, Helen Hedges asked:

What ideas have commonly underpinned learning and teaching practice in Aotearoa/New Zealand? What concepts do we need to understand to implement Te Whaariki, the early childhood curriculum?” (p.5)

“…as Joy Cullen warned when it was introduced,” she wrote, “a number of issues affect Te Whaariki‘s successful implementation. One is the incomplete professional knowledge of practitioners without an early childhood teaching qualification. These practitioners are likely to have difficulty understanding the theoretical ideas that underpin Te Whaariki. As a consequence, the curriculum may be implemented in a watered-down way, or used to justify existing teaching and learning practices. To implement Te Whaariki, it is important to understand some theory in order to provide for and extend children’s learning effectively. Theories are systems of explanations that help guide, explain and modify curriculum and practice. Practitioners who are knowledgeable about early childhood theory can identify what ‘wise’ practice might look like in the settings where they educate children.” (p.5)

Unfortunately, I think this is all still the case…

Ref: Helen Hedges (2003) ‘Teaching and learning: theories that underpin ‘wise’ practice in Aotearoa/New Zealand’ Early Education 31, pp.5-12

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
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