Notes on food requirements of children and babies

Note that there are differences of opinions in many things, as with most things to do with child care, but these statements convey something of interest.

Refined carbohydrates provide calories but no nutrients.  They are turned into glucose very rapidly, producing a short-lived energy ‘burst’ which is followed by an energy ‘low’.  As refined sugar is cheap and tastes good, it is added to many manufactured foods.”[1]

Fat contains a lot of calories in a small volume and so is a very concentrated source of energy.  This is good for babies who require lots of calories but have small stomachs.  Babies and toddlers should not be given a low-fat diet.  Fat is also needed to help the body absorb and use the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K.”[2]

Vitamins are only required in small amounts and can be found in a wide variety of foods.  There are two types: fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K, which can be stored in the body, and water-soluble vitamin C and B group vitamins, which need to be taken daily in the diet and which are destroyed by cooking.  Minerals are inorganic substances needed for a range of body functions.  There are many minerals that we need, the two most important for children being calcium and iron.”[3]

“Children need more protein in relation to their size than adults do, so it is important to make sure they get enough.”[4]

High-fibre foods are too bulky and filling for babies.  They are also too low in calories.  Your baby will get enough natural fibre from fruits and vegetables.”[5]

All babies and toddlers are different so be guided by your own child’s appetite. One- to two-year-olds need the same variety and number of servings as older children but may need fewer calories, so offer smaller portions.  You don’t have to worry if your child does not eat the suggested servings every single day; it is what the child eats over a period of two to three weeks that counts.”[6]

“As with vegetables try to give our baby a wide variety of fruit to obtain a balance of vitamins and minerals. Take care when buying fruit juices and fruit snacks, as these products often do not contain much real fruit.  Fruit yoghurts often contain very little fruit and a lot of sugar so it is better to serve plain yogurt with fresh fruit.”[7]

“Children under two years need full-fat milk.”[8]

[1] P8 Valerie Barrett Healthy Meals for Babies and Toddlers 2007 Parragon: Bath  [2] P8 Valerie Barrett Healthy Meals for Babies and Toddlers 2007 Parragon: Bath  [3] P9 Valerie Barrett Healthy Meals for Babies and Toddlers 2007 Parragon: Bath  [4] P9 Valerie Barrett Healthy Meals for Babies and Toddlers 2007 Parragon: Bath  [5] P9 Valerie Barrett Healthy Meals for Babies and Toddlers 2007 Parragon: Bath  [6] P11 Valerie Barrett Healthy Meals for Babies and Toddlers 2007 Parragon: Bath  [7] P11 Valerie Barrett Healthy Meals for Babies and Toddlers 2007 Parragon: Bath  [8] P11 Valerie Barrett Healthy Meals for Babies and Toddlers 2007 Parragon: Bath

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
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