Dietary variety

Although current dietary guidelines for children recommend dietary variety, more emphasis needs to be placed on its importance. That is, it should be made explicitly clear to parents and caregivers that establishing acceptance of a wide variety of foods is part of establishing a good relationship with food. Moreover, current guidelines should advise caregivers that subsequent presentations of a new food should occur within a few days of its initial presentation—even if it is initially rejected, because this is when the greatest increases in acceptance and consumption of the food are likely to occur.”[1]  (“Research indicates it may take as many as 10-15 attempts before a child will finally accept a new flavour. ”[2])

Yolanda Martins writes that “one method that may be used to establish eating practices rich in dietary variety may be to encourage variety seeking in infancy and early childhood.”[3] “…research examining techniques designed to increase children’s acceptance of foods suggests that there are three primary methods that may be used to encourage children’s consumption of a varied diet. These are: exposure (beginning prenatally), modeling (learning through the imitation or observation of others) and the use of rewards.” [4]


[1] p296 Yolanda Martins (2006) ‘Dietary Experiences and Food Acceptance patterns from infancy through early childhood; encouraging variety-seeking behavior’ Food, Culture & Society 9(3)Fall; pp287-298  [2] Karina Moss (2009)  “Tempting the taste buds.”  The Space. Issue 15 (Autumn); p24  [3] p291 Yolanda Martins (2006) ‘Dietary Experiences and Food Acceptance patterns from infancy through early childhood; encouraging variety-seeking behavior’ Food, Culture & Society 9(3)Fall; pp287-298  [4] pp291-292 Yolanda Martins (2006) ‘Dietary Experiences and Food Acceptance patterns from infancy through early childhood; encouraging variety-seeking behavior’ Food, Culture & Society 9(3)Fall; pp287-298

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
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