Educational systems according to Foucault

“‘Every educational system is a political means of maintaining or modifying the appropriateness of discourses with the knowledge and power they bring with them’ (Foucault, quoted in Ball, 1990, p. 3). Thus, as long as this particular classroom maintains its dominant discourse, it will remain a ‘political means’ of controlling young persons, which has far-reaching effects on their learning. However, power is not only negative; it is also productive: ‘it traverses and produces things, it induces … forms of knowledge, produces discourses’ (Foucault, 1980, p. 119). This idea raises possibilities of transforming the classroom episteme to alternative discourses such as the discourse of ‘disciplined activity’, which enables new or submerged understandings and practices to emerge. In this way the causes and elucidation of disruption will not be understood solely as problems with young human beings’ conduct and their control.” (138)

Ref: Zsuzsanna J. Millei (2005) ‘The Discourse of Control: disruption and Foucault in an early childhood classroom’ Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, Volume 6, Number 2, pp.128-139

Reference is made to: Ball, S.J. (1990) Introducing Monsieur Foucault, in S.J. Ball (Ed.) Foucault and Education: disciplines and knowledge , pp. 1-8. London: Routledge.    Foucault, M. (1980) Power/Knowledge: selected interviews and other writings, 1972-1977. Brighton: Harvester Press.

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
This entry was posted in Images of Parent Child and Expert, Literate Contexts, Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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