Food rejection patterns

Research has shown “children under 2.5 years of age typically accept most foods, whereas food rejections based on distaste begin to appear between the ages of 3 and 4. By 4 years of age, children exhibit rejection patterns similar to those of adults, but the reason underlying these rejections are primarily motivated by dislike of its taste. … at this age, children …, if asked, typically report rejecting foods for sensory-affective reasons.” [1]  “While not all children display food neophobic behaviors [unwillingness to consume novel foods], those that do typically do not exhibit them prior to the age of 2.” [2]  Indeed, Martins reminds us, “When infants transition to a solid, omnivorous diet from an all-milk one, all foods are ‘new.’”[3]

[1] p291 Yolanda Martins (2006) ‘Dietary Experiences and Food Acceptance patterns from infancy through early childhood; encouraging variety-seeking behavior’ Food, Culture & Society 9(3)Fall; pp287-298  [2] p291 Yolanda Martins (2006) ‘Dietary Experiences and Food Acceptance patterns from infancy through early childhood; encouraging variety-seeking behavior’ Food, Culture & Society 9(3)Fall; pp287-298  [3] p289 Yolanda Martins (2006) ‘Dietary Experiences and Food Acceptance patterns from infancy through early childhood; encouraging variety-seeking behavior’ Food, Culture & Society 9(3)Fall; pp287-298

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
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