The construction of memory through foods…

Check out this video (you can select for English subtitles)… it gives a way into literature through food, too… http://www.granaidellamemoria.it/index.aspx#   “The very idea of food memory is tied to the madeleine of Proust, a symbol of memory”

…kind of random, I know, but I found it through the slowfood movement’s website – there is actually a University of Gastronomic Sciences (they have a blog: http://www.ergolabcom-unisg.it/blog/) with interesting scientific stuff on it… like this blog on farting:

“Please, pull my fork”which explains that: “…Its origins are diverse: it [the fart] comes from air that we swallow during chewing and eating, from chemical reactions that happen during digestion, and by gas expulsions from bacteria living in the latter part of our gut. What stands out is that farting is completely associated with our pleasure in eating.

What most cultures resent about the flatus event is the sometimes herbacious, even pungent odor from this mixture of gases. Most are sulfur-containing compounds, like mercaptans, created as by-products during the digestion of cauliflower, eggs, and meat. Although beans are the most famous fart-inducing meal, no smelly wind is produced. Beans contain sugars that we can’t digest, but our intestinal bacteria can. Big party for them. And the resulting gaseous bubbles want only to leave your body. I should clarify here that burps are not farts that violate the flow of traffic within your body. They are produced in your stomach. But I don’t want to push (that topic) too hard right now.

The symbiosis of nutrition and flatulence is again evident during our study trips. Take dozens of genetically and morphologically different people, eating the same diet for days, who proudly proclaim their own gas at varying intervals. After a concealed sensorial analysis of it, it is a fact that your intestine has become more similar to that of the bus buddy sitting next to you, than to that of your mum.

Eating together is changing us from inside out. It is a beautiful experience, and breaking wind should be therefore seen as a great opportunity to celebrate our collective love of food.”

 

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
This entry was posted in education around food and meals, Literate Contexts, Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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