Monthly Archives: August 2012

A global nutrient plan

Julian Cribb writes: “Ours is the most profligate generation in history. We waste food and, even more important, nutrients as if they were infinite and inexhaustible. As if there were no hungry people in the world and as if there … Continue reading

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NZ Curriculum Principles

An article in a recent Education Gazette pointed to the following page on TKI: http://nzcurriculum.tki.org.nz/Curriculum-documents/The-New-Zealand-Curriculum/Principles “Principles [of the NZ Curriculum] Foundations of curriculum decision making The principles set out below embody beliefs about what is important and desirable in school … Continue reading

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A taste for sweetness

I’m so enjoying this book!!! Christian again: “The first tastes we like as newborns are sweet and comforting, and only slowly do our physiology and experiences help us to appreciate salty, acidic, bitter and umami tastes. The mouth needs training … Continue reading

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Tastes, Flavours and ‘instant food-bling’

In the afore-mentioned, excellent book, How to Cook Without Recipes, by Glynn Christian, is the following explanation about taste and flavour: Taste “Taste means each of the five primary one-dimensional characteristics of what happens on the tongue and in the mouth. … Continue reading

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The effects of fats and oils

I really like this book – How to Cook Without Recipes, by Glynn Christian. The section on fats and oils is particularly interesting (though the rest is too)… Christian writes: “Fats and oils can have such arresting flavours we often … Continue reading

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Warfare is a cultural not a genetic trait

“Warfare is a cultural not a genetic trait.” (p.11) “If there is a biological basis for aggression, and therefore for violence, you would expect every individual to be violent unless the biological basis was sex linked, in which case all … Continue reading

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Photography is a tool of power

“Recently, photography has become almost as widely practiced an amusement as sex and dancing – which means that, like every mass art form, photography is not practiced by most people as an art. It is mainly a social rite, a … Continue reading

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Visual narratives – what role do they play in ECE?

I’m wondering what role photographs play in ECE… are they providing a useful visual narrative (for children? families? teachers?)? are they an assessment tool? a tool for planning? or are they performing some other (Foucauldian!) role? “A photograph is not … Continue reading

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Diet for a Small Planet

I just really like that term! It is, in fact, the title of “a recipe book published in 1971 which focused on ways of eating that involved lower consumption of meat and refined foods.” (p.91, Brenda and Robert Vale ‘Carbon … Continue reading

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The identity of farming – a cultural crisis

“Farmers have ensured that the people of Europe are well fed. Now they are successful, they are being blamed for the surpluses… I believe we also have to face up to the fact that there is a separate crisis – … Continue reading

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