Understandings about food among 6-11 year olds

Stewart, Kate, Paul Gill, Elizabeth Treasure, and Barbara Chadwick (2006) Understandings about food among 6-11 year olds Food, Culture & Society 9(3)Fall, pp.318-336

“This paper details a qualitative study which explored how 6–11 year olds in Cardiff, Wales, think about information they receive about food and nutrition, and how this affects preferences and practices. Seventy-four children from four local primary schools participated in semi-structured one-to-one interviews. The data indicate that in both age groups:(1) Children operate contradictions about food effortlessly, incorporating notions of “bad” and “good” relating to food and its health and social consequences.(2) Information about food is drawn on inconsistently and selectively in different social environments.(3) Children operate singular notions of the health consequences of food: for example, sugar rots teeth, fat affects weight.(4) Peer influence is strong, with conforming behavior in both age groups and sexes.(5) Eating is an age-isolated activity and concept—children copy each other at school and make individualized choices at home, moderated rather than determined by parents.” (p.318)

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
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