Language and closeness

In an article I have enjoyed during several readings, Marilyn Fleer writes: “Rogoff et al. (1998) suggest that when infants are separated out from the everyday activities of their community then a need for distal forms of communication is necessary, such as vocalizing. They argue that ‘children who are constantly in the company of their caregivers may rely more on non-verbal cues, such as direction of gaze or facial expression’ and infants who are in ‘almost constant skin-to-skin contact with their mothers may manage effective communication through tactile contact in squirming and postal changes’.”[1]  She goes on to note that: “Expectations surrounding appropriate ways of interacting with infants” have also been found to vary between cultures.”[2]


[1] 130 Marilyn Fleer (2006) ‘The cultural construction of child development: creating institutional and cultural intersubjectivity’ International Journal of Early Years Education 14(2)June: 127-140    [2] 130 Marilyn Fleer (2006) ‘The cultural construction of child development: creating institutional and cultural intersubjectivity’ International Journal of Early Years Education 14(2)June: 127-140    Reference is made to: Rogoff et al. (1998) Cognition as a collaborative process, in: W. Damon (Chief Ed.) and D. Kuhn & R.S. “Siegler (vol Eds) Cognition, perceptions and language (5th edn) Handbook of Child Psychology (New York, John Wiley), 679-744

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
This entry was posted in early years education, Literate Contexts, Mono- Bi- and Multi-culturalism, Understanding literacy and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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