Monthly Archives: February 2013

‘Expressions of belonging: the effect of acculturation on the rhythm and harmony of mother-infant vocal interaction’

If you like Steiner’s thinking about rhythms at all, you’ll probably like this research, too. Maya Gratier explains that: “A sense of timing is as crucial in non-verbal communication as it is in verbal communication and, for the infant, lays … Continue reading

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Questions for reflective assessment

What surprised me? What did I learn about the child here? What did I learn about effective teaching here? What was my role in this instance? What might I have done differently? How has my practice been informed/challenged by this? … Continue reading

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democratic education – some discussion

Helfenbein and Shudak ask: “What are the challenges to teaching democracy within […] a dynamic and fluid social order?” Put another way, in what ways have the reconstruction and reinvention of contemporary society called for reconstructing/reinventing democratic education?” (p.6) “…as social studies … Continue reading

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‘superficial happy endings’

There is an article I really like on children’s conflict that analyses a group of children’s use of social structures (already in place) to enjoy agency in their world. She considers children’s adoption of gendered and learner identities in this … Continue reading

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explaining play

I mentioned this book already (Animal Play; Evolutionary, Comparative and Ecological Perspectives, Eds Marc Bekoff and John A Byers (1998)) – but again, it’s great, and reading a different essay, I still really like how this book looks at play. I particularly … Continue reading

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play fighting

There is a book,  Animal Play; Evolutionary, Comparative and Ecological Perspectives, (Eds Marc Bekoff and John A Byers (1998)) chock full of interesting essays about the value of play – as it relates to mammalian young. So much of this book … Continue reading

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The value of research

“Research moves us beyond treating knowledge domains as topics that are no more than lists of facts. Research helps us understand why some aspects of a domain are easy to understand and other aspects are more complex. For example, constructivist … Continue reading

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better conversations with children

I liked these statements! … George Forman & Ellen Hall point out: “Knowing children’s interests might help us prepare the environment, but it does not help us have better conversations. Knowing children’s skills might help us think about games to … Continue reading

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A discussion about observation – how, what and why

In an online (freely available) journal called Early Childhood Research and Practice (edited by Lilian Katz, Jean Mendoza, and Susan Fowler), there is an article on ‘the importance of observation in early education’ (http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v7n2/forman.html). Authors, George Forman & Ellen Hall, … Continue reading

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“Gun play and why children need it” – Rich and Brownlee

Diane Rich explains: “The themes that children choose to play do not all involve nurses, mums and dads, princes and princesses. There are nasty things too: monsters, ghost, baddies and, inevitably, weapons of all sorts.” (Rich, p.1 – on my … Continue reading

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