ERO on science education in NZ – 2012

Some quotes from the ERO report that condemned junior science education in NZ…

“As we operate in an economy focused on knowledge and innovation, we need children to have access to high quality science education. This is not the case at present.”[1]

“Effective practice in science teaching and learning in Years 5 to 8 was evident in less than a third of the 100 schools.”[2]

“A lack of knowledge and understanding of the science curriculum requirements, and of what constitutes effective science teaching, was evident in many schools. Many teachers do not appear to be confident or well prepared for teaching science. They have generally had limited ongoing professional learning development opportunities in science. This has contributed to the low priority many teachers place on it.”[3]

“Science programmes in the less effective schools lacked coherence and continuity. The science component was often not made explicit to students. Teachers provided flawed investigative approaches or stand-alone lessons that were not clearly linked to the science curriculum. Student involvement in experimental work was variable.”[4]


[1] Graham Stoop, Chief Review Officer (2012) Foreword. np in Education Review Office Science in The New Zealand Curriculum: Years 5 to 8.  May 2012

[2] p.1 Education Review Office Science in The New Zealand Curriculum: Years 5 to 8.  May 2012

[3] p.2 Education Review Office Science in The New Zealand Curriculum: Years 5 to 8.  May 2012

[4] p.2 Education Review Office Science in The New Zealand Curriculum: Years 5 to 8.  May 2012

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
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