(seriously) excessive TV viewing in childhood is associated with increased antisocial behavior in early adulthood

I haven’t had a chance to read this through, but the abstract alone is pretty eye-catching… (and its a New Zealand study!)

In a study published this year, Lindsay A. Robertson, Helena M. McAnally and Robert J. Hancox write:

“abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether excessive television viewing throughout childhood and adolescence is associated with increased antisocial behavior in early adulthood.
METHODS: We assessed a birth cohort of 1037 individuals born in Dunedin, New Zealand, in 1972–1973, at regular intervals from birth to age 26 years. We used regression analysis to investigate the associations between television viewing hours from ages 5 to 15 years and criminal convictions, violent convictions, diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder, and aggressive personality traits in early adulthood.
RESULTS: Young adults who had spent more time watching television during childhood and adolescence were significantly more likely to have a criminal conviction, a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder, and more aggressive personality traits compared with those who viewed less television. The associations were statistically significant after controlling for sex IQ, socioeconomic status, previous antisocial behavior, and parental control. The associations were similar for both sexes, indicating that the relationship between television viewing and antisocial behavior is similar for male and female viewers.
CONCLUSIONS: Excessive television viewing in childhood and adolescence is associated with increased antisocial behavior in early adulthood. The findings are consistent with a causal association and support the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation that children should watch no more than 1 to 2 hours of television each day.” (p.439)

NOTE: more than 1-2 hours of Tv a day is what I would call seriously excessive – obviously ‘seriously excessive’ is not the professional jargon, but still… such a small amount of time left in the day for play and social interaction has to be bad for you!

Ref: Lindsay A. Robertson, Helena M. McAnally and Robert J. Hancox (2013) Childhood and Adolescent Television Viewing and Antisocial Behavior in Early Adulthood. Pediatrics; 131 pp.439-446

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
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