References from Dale Tunnicliffe

These references from Dale Tunnicliffe’s Talking and Doing Science look good:

Alexander, R (2008) Towards Dialogic Teaching: Rethinking Classroom Talk. Cambridge: Dialogs.

Brenneman, K and Louro, IF (2008) Science journals in the preschool classroom. Early Childhood Education Journal, 36: 113-119

Broadhead, P (2006) Developing an Understanding of Young Children’s Learning through lay: The Place of Observation, Interaction and Reflection. British Educational Research Journal, 32(2): 191-207

Chin, C (2007) Questioning in Science Classrooms: Approaches that stimulate productive thinking. Journal of research in science teaching, 44(6): 815-843

Eschach, H and Fried, MN (2005) Should science be taught in early childhood? Journal of Science Education and Technology, 14(3): 315-336

Harlen, W (Ed) (2010) Principles and Big Ideas of Science Education. Hatfield: Association for Science Education.

Katz, P (2011) A case study of the use of internet photobook technology to enhance early childhood ‘Scientist’ identity. Journal of science education and technology, 20(5): 525-536

Katz, P (2012) Using Photo Books to Encourage Young children’s science identities. journal of emergent science, 3

Mercer, N, Dawes L, Wegerif, R and Sams, C (2004) Reasoning as scientists: ways of helping children to use language to learn science. British educational research journal, 30(3): 359-377

Pines, AL and west, LHT (1986) Conceptual understanding and science learning: an interpretation of research within a sources-of-knowledge framework. Science education, 70(5): 583-604

Sackes, M, Trundle KC, Bell RL and O’Connell A (2011) The influence of early science experience in kindergarten on children’s immediate and later science achievement: evidence from the early childhood longitudinal study. Journal of research in science teaching, 48(2): 217-235

Scribner-Maclean, M (1996) Science at home. Science and children, 33: 44-48

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
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