More notes on play

Again, some more quotes from Vivian Gussin Paley on the importance of play:

  • “The children themselves continually reminded us that play was still their most usable context.  It was not the monsters they invented that frightened them in kindergarten; it was being told to sit still and pay attention for long periods of time.  Short attention spans were not yet considered a deficit in my schools….  We saw that the children’s concentration was intense when they played and we filled the other times with playful rhyming games, songs, and poetry, to which we added picture books and fairy tales.”[1]
  • Having not listened carefully enough to their play, we did not realize how much time was needed by children in order to create the scenery and develop the skills for their ever-changing dramas. We removed the element – time – that enabled play to be effective, then blamed the children when their play skills did not meet our expectations.”[2]
  • Quoting Sara Smilansky: “I’ve suggested here that good play is taught by children to one another and it is probably the necessary precursor for every other kind of learning in a classroom.”[3]

[1] P43-44 Vivian Gussin Paley (2004) A Child’s work; the importance of fantasy play.  The University of Chicago Press: Chicago and London

[2] P46 Vivian Gussin Paley (2004) A Child’s work; the importance of fantasy play.  The University of Chicago Press: Chicago and London

[3] P71 Vivian Gussin Paley (2004) A Child’s work; the importance of fantasy play.  The University of Chicago Press: Chicago and London

Advertisements

About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
This entry was posted in early years education and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s