Monthly Archives: October 2013

the meaning of our symbols and rituals

“It is the children who teach us the meaning of our symbols and rituals, making sense of them by pretending they are something else.” Ref: p.10 Vivian Gussin Paley (1990) The Boy who Would be a Helicopter: the uses of storytelling … Continue reading

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where the living takes place in the classroom

“Once we push deeply into the collective imagination, it is easier to establish connections and build mythologies. The classroom that does not create its own legends has not traveled beneath the surface to where the living takes place. The fantasies … Continue reading

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What is your teaching style?

“A style of teaching is best illuminated by those who do not meet the teacher’s expectations.” Ref: p.11 Vivian Gussin Paley (1990) The Boy who Would be a Helicopter: the uses of storytelling in the classroom.  Harvard University Press: Cambridge, Massachusetts, … Continue reading

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When my name became Teacher – Vivian Gussin Paley

Actually, it’s worth reiterating Vivian Gussin Paley’s opening statement in The Boy who Would be a Helicopter: “I was neither a good listener nor an able storyteller when my name became Teacher. What I doubtless knew as a child was buried … Continue reading

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Vivian Gussin Paley

I just googled Vivian Gussin Paley quickly (there’s really heaps out there on her and by her). Here is some, though: “None of us are to be found in a set of tasks or lists of attributes; we can be … Continue reading

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Friendship and fantasy – children’s stories and their function in the group

I really love Vivian Gussin Paley’s writing. I hadn’t yet read The Boy Who Would be a Helicopter and am just now enjoying it. In it, Paley describes her storytelling classroom and their re-enactments of those stories – all, of … Continue reading

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Illness is an experience with meaning – what is your story?

Lisa A. Hollingsworth and Mary J Didelot write that “Illness is a perceptual phenomenon:  It is far more than a complex physiological element. This was further posited by Lord John Habgood who stated, “…that life events are more important than our … Continue reading

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The Power of Addiction and The Addiction of Power: Gabor Maté

Pennie Brownlee just drew our attention to the following TED talk: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66cYcSak6nE In her October 2013 newsletter, she writes: ““The source of addictions in not to be found in genes, but in the early childhood environment,” says Hungarian-born Canadian doctor Gabor … Continue reading

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Gluttony and the 7 sins

On that note (Smart Talks, I mean)… last year, the Smart Talk series considered the 7 deadly sins – so there was one on Gluttony. I wonder how it relates to food education and nutritional / culinary literacy. Radio National … Continue reading

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LATE at the Museum

Looks great: LATE: Of Gods and Men, SMART Talk series, 2013 http://www.aucklandmuseum.com/whats-on/series/late I missed most of them, but hopefully Radio NZ National will pick them up again: http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/smarttalk. I especially would have liked to attend: LATE: Tangaroa – Our Oceans THURSDAY, … Continue reading

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