Monthly Archives: September 2014

Learning how to program is the new literacy

In a recent New Scientist (6 September 2014), Niall Firth describes a major shift in English curriculum and one which raises a number of questions around literacy… He writes: “This month, England is embarking on a big new experiment. Children … Continue reading

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Good resource for autism

http://www.autism.org.uk/about-autism/all-about-diagnosis/diagnosis-the-process-for-children/getting-a-diagnosis-children.aspx

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Some interesting comments on metaphor

There is a really wonderful article on ‘The Metaphor as a Mediator between semantic and analogic modes of thought’ from 1978, by Brenda Beck (it includes replies, which are also interesting). Some interesting statements/points made by Beck include: “According to … Continue reading

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A question on metaphor in development

This is an interesting question: “at what age, etc., do people adapt to new metaphor themes the fastest?” Ref: p.96 Brenda EF Beck et al. (Mar 1978) The Metaphor as a Mediator between semantic and analogic modes of thought [and … Continue reading

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A child, defined

Ruth Wilson makes an interesting point, I think, when she considers the definition of ‘a child’ in the dictionary. She writes: “A child, as defined by the dictionary (The American Heritage, fourth edition), is ‘a person between birth and puberty; … Continue reading

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What science is

I particularly enjoy this description of what science is: In a Kim Hill panel discussion on Radio New Zealand, Paul Callaghan explains: “…Science has a particular way of operating. It’s based on observation with requirements of consistency. And one of … Continue reading

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Using the outdoors to foster academic goals

Ruth Wilson writes: “The term ‘academic’ is often associated with traditional subject areas taught in a formal school setting, such as reading, mathematics, science and social studies. Related goals can include desired learning outcomes in the areas of knowledge, skills, … Continue reading

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Outdoor play

Ruth Wilson asserts that “While creative play can and does occur in almost any environment, recent research indicates that natural outdoor spaces have a special quality that promotes the frequency, duration, and quality of creative play (Bilton 2010a, Elliot 2008, … Continue reading

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Another quote on the value of play

“Play – it’s natural for young children. We see children engaging in play almost from the moment of birth. They play with their hands; they play with sounds; and they play with almost anything anywhere. Animals and adult humans engage … Continue reading

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Get the sugar out of our food

“Get the sugar out of our food” seems to be the basic message of Nigel Latta’s recent programme on the toxicity of sugar… and its role in a ‘health crisis’ of obviously epic proportions. Interesting stuff! http://tvnz.co.nz/nigel_latta/video

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