Monthly Archives: January 2015

Eat bugs. Feed the bugs in your gut

There is a wonderful little book by Jeff Leach (science writer, health advocate and anthropologist), called Eat bugs. Not too much. Mainly with plants. It’s a bit of a must read for anyone who feeds children- or themselves! In a … Continue reading

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I like nonsense

“I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells.” – Dr Seuss Quoted p.186 Anat Baniel (2012) kids beyond limits: breakthrough results for children with autism, Asperger’s, brain damage, ADHD, and undiagnosed developmental delays. Perigee: New York

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Movement

“Movement is life; without movement life is unthinkable.” – Moshe Feldenkrais “Nothing happens until something moves.” – Albert Einstein Quoted p.48 Anat Baniel (2012) kids beyond limits: breakthrough results for children with autism, Asperger’s, brain damage, ADHD, and undiagnosed developmental … Continue reading

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metaphorical and metonymical language use in children with ASD

Reviewing the literature on metaphor and metonymy usage/difficulties in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, Sergio Melogno, Maria Antonietta Pinto, Gabriel Levi write: “Linguistic and communicative difficulties in children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are frequently the focus of experimental research. In fact, these … Continue reading

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Conceptual Metaphor Theory vs. cognitive narratology

Michael Sinding explains the theories of Conceptual Metaphor Theory and cognitive narratology and how he understands these together. He writes: “I take the notion of the schema as the main type of conceptual structure that links cognitive research on metaphor … Continue reading

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The freedom to learn is a great liability

Moshe Feldenkrais states: “The freedom to learn is a great liability; initially, it also is a restriction. There is no freedom of choice or free will when there is only one way of acting. Learning makes it possible to have … Continue reading

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On the primacy of hearing

In an essay titled, ‘On the Primacy of Hearing,’ (first published, 1976) Moshe Feldenkrais writes: “In the darkness of human fetal existence, there is little likelihood that seeing takes place. But even though there is no seeing, there is hearing. … Continue reading

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self-control

I know I’ve removed it from it’s context, but I liked this statement: “…when self-control is defective, something else is defective: there is arrested self-development. Hence, the correction of these defects should not be experienced as the “treatment of an … Continue reading

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Behavior and self-image

“The behavior of human beings is firmly based on the self-image they have made for themselves. Accordingly, if one wishes to change one’s behavior, it will be necessary to change this image. What is a self-image? I wouild argue that … Continue reading

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Neuroplasticity

Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa writes: “Perhaps the author who has done the most to explain neuroplasticity to the public is physician Norman Doidge, who has documented studies that “showed that children are not always stuck with the mental abilities they are born … Continue reading

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