Still more reflective questions

The first of the three Learning Media videos on putting Te Whariki into practice poses the following reflective questions:

  • “What is my understanding of the historical context of Te Whariki, and what does this mean for my practice today?
  • What is my understanding of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in relation to early childhood education?
  • Do I have a working understanding of Te Tiriti o Waitangi?
  • How do I ensure that all the standards of the framework are integrated in my practice?
  • What do I do to ensure that my curriculum reflects the bicultural nature of New Zealand society?
  • How does the curriculum implement in this setting reflect the cultural heritage of all children?
  • How do the teaching strategies I use ensure socially and culturally mediated learning?
  • Do I reflect on the transitions experienced by children, for example into, out of, and within this service?
  • What is my understanding of the meaning of each principle and how it links to the others?
  • How does my daily practice reflect an understanding of the principles?
  • How do I promote the holistic development of each child?
  • Do I understand the Maori perspective of holistic development?
  • How are the relationships in this service responsive, reciprocal, and respectful – for the children, parents, and educators?
  • Do I understand the concept of whanau dynamics in relation to the development of culturally appropriate interactions?
  • Are my interactions with children responsive and reciprocal?
  • Do the principles have different implications for infants, toddlers, and young children?
  • Do my practices reflect my understandings of the principles from a Maori perspective?
  • Is my content knowledge sufficient to provide quality learning for children?
  • What is my understanding of how children learn?
  • What is my understanding of Maori human development theory?
  • What is my understanding of learning and teaching from a Maori perspective?
  • What is my understanding of learning and teaching from the perspective of Pacific peoples and those from other cultures?
  • How do I ensure that all the strands are integrated in my practice?
  • Does my understanding ensure that I work effectively with infants, toddlers, and young children?
  • How do I use the goals of Te Whariki?
  • What process do we use to identify goals for children’s learning?
  • How do we set goals and learning outcomes for the children in our service, both as individuals and in groups?
  • How do we plan?
  • In what way does our programme reflect a bicultural perspective?
  • What are the processes used for the development of culturally accepted learning outcomes?
  • In what way do we use our subject knowledge and pedagogical  understandings to shape learning outcomes and learning experiences for children?
  • What do we do to ensure that children’s learning includes both content and process?
  • How could children’s learning include both content and process from a Maori perspective?
  • What is our understanding of appropriate literacy and numeracy experiences for infants, toddlers, and young children?
  • How do the literacy and numeracy experiences we provide reflect knowledge from the Maori world?
  • What do the goals of Te Whariki mean in our service? How do they guide adult behaviour, evaluation, and reflection?
  • What range of teaching strategies do I use?
  • Where do these fit on the continuum of strategies? Are they the most effective in relation to assisting children’s learning in centre and home-based services?
  • What do I understand to be culturally appropriate strategies for teaching?
  • How does my practice reflect an understanding of the different learning styles of children?
  • What is my understanding of Maori pedagogy?
  • What are my curriculum content and process knowledge strengths?
  • What are my curriculum content and process knowledge weaknesses?
  • Is my knowledge good enough to respond effectively to the teachable moment?
  • Is my knowledge good enough to respond effectively to the teachable moment?
  • Is my knowledge of Maori concepts, practices, and language enough to provide a quality bicultural programme?
  • Is my knowledge of the concepts and practices of Pacific peoples, and people of other cultures, sufficient to provide a quality multicultural programme?
  • How do I make sure that the child or children are the focus of the curriculum and yet make sure that I utilise my knowledge of the essential learning areas?
  • where do I seek support for the ongoing development of a bicultural programme?
  • What is the purpose of a philosophy?
  • What is Maori philosophy?
  • How can you resolve differing philosophies within a service?
  • How do you articulate your philosophy?
  • How does your personal philosophy influence the broader philosophy of your setting?
  • How does the philosophy of your setting accommodate differing viewpoints?
  • How could your philosophy influence a bicultural curriculum?”

Ref: Ministry of Education (2000)Te Whariki: the Big Picture. Learning Media: Wellington

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
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