Category Archives: differently abled learners

Hmm looks interesting – Uta Frith – Autism: The First Fifty Years

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Talent is not an inborn thing

“Talent is a word that grown-up people have found to describe a quality once it’s there and everyone knows that it’s there. Therefore, talent is not an inborn thing.” ~ Moshe Feldenkrais (p.122) I loved reading this interview! Here are … Continue reading

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metaphorical and metonymical language use in children with ASD

Reviewing the literature on metaphor and metonymy usage/difficulties in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, Sergio Melogno, Maria Antonietta Pinto, Gabriel Levi write: “Linguistic and communicative difficulties in children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are frequently the focus of experimental research. In fact, these … Continue reading

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On the primacy of hearing

In an essay titled, ‘On the Primacy of Hearing,’ (first published, 1976) Moshe Feldenkrais writes: “In the darkness of human fetal existence, there is little likelihood that seeing takes place. But even though there is no seeing, there is hearing. … Continue reading

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self-control

I know I’ve removed it from it’s context, but I liked this statement: “…when self-control is defective, something else is defective: there is arrested self-development. Hence, the correction of these defects should not be experienced as the “treatment of an … Continue reading

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movement and emotion

Introducing a collection of papers by Moshe Feldenkrais, David Zemach-Bersin also explains Feldenkrais’s approach: “Feldenkrais provides us with some of the most cogent and sophisticated arguments ever made for the biological and functional unity of the mind and body. During … Continue reading

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Theory of mind

…quite a concise and clear summary: http://www.child-encyclopedia.com/documents/astington-edwardangxp.pdf

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On the importance of observation

I’m still making notes on Peter Gray’s Free to Learn… He writes quite a bit on the benefits of age-mixed learning (a lovely argument to read). Consider, for example: “In age-mixed groups, the younger children can engage in and learn … Continue reading

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Age segregation vs mixed-age learning

I’m rather enjoying Peter Gray’s Free to Learn… consider some of what he writes on the segregation of children according to age in school: “Age segregation and lack of opportunities for free play add to the forces that work against … Continue reading

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Good resource for autism

http://www.autism.org.uk/about-autism/all-about-diagnosis/diagnosis-the-process-for-children/getting-a-diagnosis-children.aspx

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