Category Archives: art education

the visual metaphor of Edward Gorey – an analysis

Examining “the manipulation of visual metaphor in the cartoons of Edward Gorey,” Victor Kennedy once wrote that “Like verbal metaphor, visual metaphor may be analyzed using I. A. Richards’s categories of tenor, vehicle, and ground. Gorey’s fictional world is dark, … Continue reading

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whoosh lines, strokes and metaphors in 20thC illustration

(Some twenty years ago), Kennedy, Green and Vervaeke wrote an interesting article in which they considered the history of whoosh lines and strokes to indicate actions or sensory experiences in comic illustration of the 20th Century. Their interest in this … Continue reading

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Creativity and emotional health

“Creativity should be explored as representing the highest degree of emotional health, as the expression of normal people in the act of actualizing themselves.” ~ Rollo May (1976) Ref: quoted p83 Daria Halprin (2003) The Expressive Body in Life, Art … Continue reading

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The whare tupuna

In their discussion of the Manawa: Pacific Heartbeat exhibition 2003, Nigel Reading and Gary Wyatt write: “The Maori believe that the whare tupuna (ancestral meeting house) takes on the form of the body of an ancestor. Roi Toia uses the ceremonial … Continue reading

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Maori legends – patupaiarehe, taniwha, spirits and heroes

Just a note to say that I really enjoyed this book of legends – A W Reed’s Favourite Maori Legends (revised by Ross Calman). I think it’s important to share such tales with children – to colour in their mental … Continue reading

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How children link play, pictures and print

Describing how children link play, pictures and print, Anne Haas Dyson tells us: “In considering the role of symbol making in children’s lives, we should not assume that the developmental path is from child drawer to adult artist or from child … Continue reading

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Clay for little fingers

Joan Bouza Koster explains: “Children need to be introduced to clay slowly, over a period of time. Its qualities are very different from the ubiquitous playdoughs, and children need too identify this new modeling material as something unique, requiring different … Continue reading

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Children’s art is serious work

Carol Seefeldt writes: “For those endorsing cognitive theories, children’s art is serious work, for art ‘is a language – a form of cognitive expression’.” (p.39) “As children create art, they must organize their thoughts and actions into patterns and symbols. … Continue reading

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Teaching Maori Art to Children

There is a very old booklet, titled ‘Teaching Maori Art to Children’ (part of a series called ‘Primary Arts’ I think – I haven’t got an original!). It makes a number of art activity suggestions, but also has the following … Continue reading

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Maori rock art

I came across this blog: http://www.tekaraka.co.nz/Blog/from-moa-to-taniwha … which I thought very interesting…. and which led me to this blog: http://www.firstlighttravel.com/blog/prehistoric-maori-rock-art-a-window-into-early-new-zealand-occupation/ … and so on. I really loved that series of stamps NZ Post put out ages ago, so I went to the library. According … Continue reading

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