Category Archives: Understanding literacy

The teacher’s daily job is to raise the dead

“Knowledge is preserved in dead codes – dessicated symbols in books – and the teacher’s daily job is to raise the dead, to bring the codes back to life in new minds.” ~ Kieran Egan (p.109, An Imaginative Approach) “Knowledge is … Continue reading

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Codex Seraphinius

I always enjoy Rachel Hartman’s posts. Recently, she pointed us to a Brain Pickings post that introduces the Codex Seraphinius. It sounds amazing: “In an interview for Wired Italy, Serafini aptly captures the subtle similarity to children’s books in how the Codex bewitches our grown-up fancy with its bizarre … Continue reading

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Irlen Method websites

http://www.irlen.com http://www.newcastle.edu.au/centre/sed/irlen http://www.everybody.co.nz http://www.irlenuk.com http://www.irlen.be http://www.irlen.ch http://www.irlen.ch http://www.irlen-center.de http://www.irlen.co.kr http://www.inpa.info http://www.irlen.org.uk http://www.newcastle.edu.au/centre/sed/irlen http://www.irlenadvocacy.org

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Assessing reading ability

Helen Irlen again: “Reading difficulties have basically been defined by standardized reading tests. Those instruments look for very specific types of problems, primarily in comprehension, encoding and decoding skills, and sight vocabulary. But reading encompasses many more skills than those. … Continue reading

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The physical side of reading

Helen Irlen writes: “Almost never are those with reading problems questioned about whether reading is comfortable. It is assumed that reading is equally comfortable for everyone. In reality, there are some for whom reading is very painful. There are actual … Continue reading

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Think of learning problems as layered

Helen Irlen explains: “A learning or reading problem can be presented as a concept of layers. There can be one layer or several to any problem. Dealing with the problem as a whole is usually unproductive. It’s better to try … Continue reading

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Identifying possible learning disabilities

According to Helen Irlen: “It’s important to diagnose learning disabilities  as early as possible in the child’s educational career. Although it is often difficult to determine if a child has a learning disability before he or she is six or … Continue reading

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Reading difficulties and the Irlen method

Talking to a pediatric Occupational Therapist about Irlen Syndrome, she told me that people don’t often think to ask children who are struggling to read ‘What does it look like when you read?’ Children who have Scotopic Sensitivity Syndrome may reply … Continue reading

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Maori legends – patupaiarehe, taniwha, spirits and heroes

Just a note to say that I really enjoyed this book of legends – A W Reed’s Favourite Maori Legends (revised by Ross Calman). I think it’s important to share such tales with children – to colour in their mental … Continue reading

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How children link play, pictures and print

Describing how children link play, pictures and print, Anne Haas Dyson tells us: “In considering the role of symbol making in children’s lives, we should not assume that the developmental path is from child drawer to adult artist or from child … Continue reading

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