Tag Archives: Bilingual children

Sustainability education and a collective perspective

There is an interesting discussion about sustainability on Radio NZ National in which some good points on the values promoted by education are raised. Particularly: Bronwyn Hayward discusses the results of some research she has been involved in bilingual schools. … Continue reading

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The 4G Spectrum debate

The most recent episode of Te Tēpu dealt with the 4G spectrum claim and was really interesting – the arguments presented are incredibly valid and merit serious consideration by educators. Te Tēpu Sunday 14 July 2013 http://www.maoritelevision.com/tv/shows/te-tepu/S09E014/te-tepu

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Teaching in multicultural contexts

Just an aside – I want to read this book! Bilingual and ESL classrooms : teaching in multicultural contexts / Carlos J. Ovando, Mary Carol Combs. New York, NY, : McGraw-Hill, c2012 5th edition Contents note: The Past Catches Up … Continue reading

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Multilingualism, monolingualism and attitudes to language in children’s fiction

In an article written 11 years ago, Gillian Lathey considers the representation of other European peoples in British children’s literature. She looks at how language is used to create character in various examples of British children’s fiction and how foreign … Continue reading

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How our educational institutions take account of cultural variations

“How our educational institutions take account of cultural variations has generally not been foregrounded in early childhood beliefs and practices within culturally and linguistically diverse communities.”[1] [1] 136 Marilyn Fleer (2006) ‘The cultural construction of child development: creating institutional and … Continue reading

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Cultural diversity and the institution of early childhood education

While early childhood education, its habits, mores and traditions, are known to be diverse in New Zealand, the sector has also, to a large extent, been normalised. In spite of the goal of providing for multiple cultural approaches (overtly stated … Continue reading

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Language socialisation

“children learn to differentiate between languages through a process of language socialisation.” (Makin, Campbell, & Diaz (1995), p44)

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Consistency helps children sort out languages

“Whenever more than one language is used at home or in an education and care setting, consistency of pattern seems to help children to sort out the different languages.” (Makin, Campbell, & Diaz (1995), p44)

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Conditions of bilingual development

There is no ideal strategy for bilingual development but it is important to set up “conditions that maximise opportunities for meaningful communication” (Makin, Campbell, & Diaz (1995), p44)

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advantages of bilingualism

“Some of the advantages of bilingualism identified in… [certain] studies are increased self-esteem, increased problem-solving abilities, cognitive flexibility, verbal creativity and greater metalinguistic awareness.” (Makin, Campbell, & Diaz (1995), p38)  They go on to say that “social conditions, however, remain … Continue reading

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