Tag Archives: children’s conflict

Sudbury Valley School – Peter Gray on why this alternative to schools works

Peter Gray’s Free to Learn discusses an alternative approach to schooling, as it is exemplified by the Sudbury Valley School (http://www.sudval.org/). I wish we had schools like this here in New Zealand! “Sudbury Valley is a private day school located … Continue reading

Posted in Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners, play, social and political contexts, Standardised Testing, Teaching excellence | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

“Instead of eliminating the script, make it a focus of classroom discourse”

A decade or so ago, Jane Katch wrote a book reflecting on her difficulties with her class’s use of violence in their fantasy play. I like the honesty of her writing and how she acknowledges the personal reasons behind so many of … Continue reading

Posted in Literate Contexts, Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners, The effect of multimedia on children/childhood | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

‘superficial happy endings’

There is an article I really like on children’s conflict that analyses a group of children’s use of social structures (already in place) to enjoy agency in their world. She considers children’s adoption of gendered and learner identities in this … Continue reading

Posted in early years education, Images of Parent Child and Expert, Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners, social and political contexts, Understanding Education | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

References for researching children’s conflict

I just decided to collate some of the stuff I have scattered around on children’s conflict… Adult behaviour and impact Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish (1982) How to talk so kids will listen & listen so kids will talk. Avon … Continue reading

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