Tag Archives: cultures of violence in New Zealand

Societal violence and the treatment of children

I’m still taking notes from Peter Gray’s Free to Learn: “…recently, research involving many types of societies has shown systematic relationships between a society’s structure and its treatment of children. In one study, Carol and Melvin Ember analyzed massive amounts … Continue reading

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(seriously) excessive TV viewing in childhood is associated with increased antisocial behavior in early adulthood

I haven’t had a chance to read this through, but the abstract alone is pretty eye-catching… (and its a New Zealand study!) In a study published this year, Lindsay A. Robertson, Helena M. McAnally and Robert J. Hancox write: “abstract … Continue reading

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Education … for democracy and non-violence…

I loved this essay – it should be a must-read for all educational leaders, and perhaps especially for those in English departments as we come up to 2014 and the anniversary of WWI, which will no doubt spark renewed interest … Continue reading

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The Treaty of Waitangi; a description

20 years ago, in a book exploring the cultures of violence in New Zealand, Jane And James Ritchie considered the place of the Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand society. They wrote: “The facts of history are clear. The Maori … Continue reading

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Fully conscious and responsible…

“It is a myth of popular psychology that our actions are initiated by ourselves, that we are fully conscious of and responsible for all that we do and intend. The truth of the matter is that most of our behaviour … Continue reading

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Racial hatred, rioting, and the police in New Zealand history

“In any discussion of violence,” Jane Ritchie and James Ritchie write, “we must consider the world-wide phenomena of racial hatred and violence in holy or nationalistic crusades, rioting, terrorism, and political violence. Prior to the 1981 Springbok tour, New Zealanders … Continue reading

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Perpetuating the culture of violence

According to Jane Ritchie and James Ritchie, the “modern criminological consensus is that more police, longer sentences, and more punitive practices simply do not reduce violent offending and are, therefore, a waste of public money. They perpetuate the culture of … Continue reading

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“Monoculturalism is oppressive and is itself violent.”

Jane Ritchie and James Ritchie once stated that “Monoculturalism is oppressive and is itself violent.” (p.88) “In a multicultural society,” they wrote, “common standards of behaviour form the basis of a common society and from there we can all move … Continue reading

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