Tag Archives: Early learning

what language wires in to us

Another very interesting interview with Moshe Feldenkrais: “When the brain comes into the world, it is fit to do only what any animal brain can do: it attends to breathing, to digestion, to the automatic processes of the body. Beyond … Continue reading

Posted in Literate Contexts, Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners, Mono- Bi- and Multi-culturalism, social and political contexts | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Societal violence and the treatment of children

I’m still taking notes from Peter Gray’s Free to Learn: “…recently, research involving many types of societies has shown systematic relationships between a society’s structure and its treatment of children. In one study, Carol and Melvin Ember analyzed massive amounts … Continue reading

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Another interesting point from Peter Gray – on how we perceive children

I found this notion of the shifting relationship between mankind and ‘nature’ and how it shapes our notions of child-rearing thought-provoking: “Finally, I’d like to suggest an additional reason for the difference between hunter-gatherers and subsequent societies in child-rearing methods. Agriculture … Continue reading

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Education and hunter-gatherer children

“Education, by my definition, is cultural transmission. It is the set of processes by which each new generation of human beings, in any social group, acquires and builds upon the skills, knowledge, lore, and values – that is, the culture … Continue reading

Posted in History of Childhood, Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners, play, social and political contexts, Standardised Testing, Teaching excellence, Understanding Education | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Peter Gray on free play vs resume building in childhood

Peter Gray writes: “Children are designed, by nature, to play and explore on their own, independently of adults. They need freedom in order to develop; without it they suffer. The drive to play freely is a basic, biological drive. Lack … Continue reading

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Another quote on the value of play

“Play – it’s natural for young children. We see children engaging in play almost from the moment of birth. They play with their hands; they play with sounds; and they play with almost anything anywhere. Animals and adult humans engage … Continue reading

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Little ninjas learn safe play

I couldn’t agree more! There’s an article in today’s Herald online that presents the results of a Massey study into children’s physical education. It states: “Training babies to become shoulder-rolling “little ninjas” could reduce the rate of children seriously injuring … Continue reading

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Neuroscience, ECE and play

In a Guest Editorial to the Early Childhood Education Journal, Stephen Rushton “examines neuroscience and its impact on the field of education. [He] intertwines research with basic principles of learning…. The four principles are: (1) the brain is uniquely organized; (2) … Continue reading

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Kindergarten: the seed pearl of the modern era

Norman Brosterman describes kindergarten as “the seed pearl of the modern era” (p.7) In his history of Froebel’s kindergarten, he writes: “Kindergarten has been around so long, and is so familiar, that it is natural to assume personal expertise on … Continue reading

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A classroom that avoids punishment as a learning tool

After describing some of her worse teacher moments telling children off for their mess (beautifully and reassuringly described, as might be expected from her), Vivian Gussin Paley offers her thoughts on teacher intervention in disruptive play: She first discusses how a … Continue reading

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