Tag Archives: education in history

How schools came to serve the state

Arguing for changes to the structure of ‘schooling’ we employ in countries like New Zealand and the USA, Peter Gray provides a history of what we know as schools, beginning with an explanation of child-rearing in hunter-gatherer societies, then explaining the … Continue reading

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Peter Gray on free play vs resume building in childhood

Peter Gray writes: “Children are designed, by nature, to play and explore on their own, independently of adults. They need freedom in order to develop; without it they suffer. The drive to play freely is a basic, biological drive. Lack … Continue reading

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Kindergarten: the seed pearl of the modern era

Norman Brosterman describes kindergarten as “the seed pearl of the modern era” (p.7) In his history of Froebel’s kindergarten, he writes: “Kindergarten has been around so long, and is so familiar, that it is natural to assume personal expertise on … Continue reading

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On the Science and Culture of Learning – Kieran Egan

According to Kieran Egan, the reason “why so many research findings seem to have had no discernible beneficial impact on education is that most of the research on learning, development, and so on is not about education.” (p.182) Concluding his educational … Continue reading

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Herbert Spencer – according to Kieran Egan

“Men dress their children’s minds as they do their bodies, in the prevailing fashion” ~ Herbert Spencer, 1928 Explaining Herbert Spencer’s influence on education over the last century, Kieran Egan writes: “Although John Dewey’s educational ideas are widely known today, … Continue reading

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Progressivism and ‘getting it wrong’ in the history of Education

Introducing his Getting it Wrong From the Beginning: Our Progressivist Inheritance from Herbert Spencer, John Dewey, and Jean Piaget (2002), Kieran Egan writes: “During the late nineteenth century, the modern apparatus for schooling everyone was put in place. [This book is about…] the … Continue reading

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Industry in NZ

This book on NZ Industries is quite old now, but it caught my eye because I’m trying to research food science, with a focus on New Zealand food/science. An aside: New Zealand literature and refrigerated shipping It also caught my eye … Continue reading

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Making progress possible – Education Acts and dumb luck with decent politicians

An old article on RA Butler, architect of Britain’s ‘great’ 1944 Education Act (who succeeded in making changes in a tricky post – a portfolio given to him by Churchill with the intention of dropping him from view), offers up … Continue reading

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