Tag Archives: Moshe Feldenkrais

Do we educate to narrow or expand the life process?

“There comes a point where our education as it developed does not help us, but very often limits and directs us into channels which are not conducive to health. We become so unhealthy that we have to retire before we … Continue reading

Posted in Understanding Education | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

What comes first – the motor pattern or the feeling?

Again, and still working with Moshe Feldenkrais’s ideas, this is such an interesting stance on learning… Feldenkrais once wrote: “It takes us longer to think the numbers from twenty to thirty than from one to ten, although the numerical intervals … Continue reading

Posted in Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners, Neuroscience | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

what language wires in to us

Another very interesting interview with Moshe Feldenkrais: “When the brain comes into the world, it is fit to do only what any animal brain can do: it attends to breathing, to digestion, to the automatic processes of the body. Beyond … Continue reading

Posted in Literate Contexts, Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners, Mono- Bi- and Multi-culturalism, social and political contexts | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Talent is not an inborn thing

“Talent is a word that grown-up people have found to describe a quality once it’s there and everyone knows that it’s there. Therefore, talent is not an inborn thing.” ~ Moshe Feldenkrais (p.122) I loved reading this interview! Here are … Continue reading

Posted in differently abled learners, Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The three aspects of personhood

According to Moshe Feldenkrais: “A person is made of three entities: the nervous system, which is the core; the body – skeleton, viscera, and muscles – which is the envelope of the core; and the environment, which is space, gravitation, and … Continue reading

Posted in Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The freedom to learn is a great liability

Moshe Feldenkrais states: “The freedom to learn is a great liability; initially, it also is a restriction. There is no freedom of choice or free will when there is only one way of acting. Learning makes it possible to have … Continue reading

Posted in Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners, The Educational Debates | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

On the primacy of hearing

In an essay titled, ‘On the Primacy of Hearing,’ (first published, 1976) Moshe Feldenkrais writes: “In the darkness of human fetal existence, there is little likelihood that seeing takes place. But even though there is no seeing, there is hearing. … Continue reading

Posted in differently abled learners, early years education, Literate Contexts | Tagged | Leave a comment

self-control

I know I’ve removed it from it’s context, but I liked this statement: “…when self-control is defective, something else is defective: there is arrested self-development. Hence, the correction of these defects should not be experienced as the “treatment of an … Continue reading

Posted in differently abled learners | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Behavior and self-image

“The behavior of human beings is firmly based on the self-image they have made for themselves. Accordingly, if one wishes to change one’s behavior, it will be necessary to change this image. What is a self-image? I wouild argue that … Continue reading

Posted in early years education, Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners, play | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

movement and emotion

Introducing a collection of papers by Moshe Feldenkrais, David Zemach-Bersin also explains Feldenkrais’s approach: “Feldenkrais provides us with some of the most cogent and sophisticated arguments ever made for the biological and functional unity of the mind and body. During … Continue reading

Posted in differently abled learners, early years education, Images of Parent Child and Expert, play | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment