Child and wild animal – food for thought

“During nearly all the history of our species man has lived in association with large, often terrifying, but always exciting animals. Models of the survivors, toy elephants, giraffes and pandas, are an integral part of contemporary childhood. If all these animals became extinct, as is quite possible, are we sure that some irreparable harm to our psychological development would not be done?” ~ G. E. Hutchinson,

quoted p.275 Paul Shepard ‘On Animal Friends’ pp.275-300 in Eds. Stephen R Kellert and Edward O Wilson (1993) The Biophilia Hypothesis. Shearwater Books. Washington, DC; Covelo, California

On a similar tangent, Aaron Katcher and Gregory Wilkins observe that “Children raised on television are exposed to vast amounts of information but fail to learn very much about their immediate environment. Too much is learned from a small two-dimensional representation of global events and too little from direct exploration of their own place in the world.” (p.192)

Aaron Katcher and Gregory Wilkins ‘Dialogue with Animals: Its Nature and Culture’ pp. 173-197 (?) in Eds. Stephen R Kellert and Edward O Wilson (1993) The Biophilia Hypothesis. Shearwater Books. Washington, DC; Covelo, California

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
This entry was posted in ecological literacy, social and political contexts, The effect of multimedia on children/childhood. Bookmark the permalink.

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