Matariki resources – and kai

Breakfast Eaters‘ have the following to say about Matariki (Note the recipe links, too!):

“Matariki

matariki- takoha koha kaiEach winter the stars of Matariki and Puanga signal the end of one year in Aotearoa and the beginning of the next.

Traditionally Māori have recognised the rise of Matariki as a time to celebrate and prepare for the indigenous New Year. It was a time when crops were harvested, and seafood and birds were collected – a time of celebration and plenty, but also a time for preparing and storing for times of shortage ahead.

Matariki was a time to practise manaakitanga – to share kai and present offerings to others.

Nowadays during Matariki we can express manaakitanga by:

  • Acknowledging the value of healthy kai as a taonga for achieving hauora Māori.
  • Offering healthy kai to whānau and manuhiri.
  • Using koha kai as a way of supporting and nurturing others.

The stars of Matariki

Matariki is the Māori name for a cluster of stars – a seven-star constellation that appears in late May or early June each year.

There are two translations for Matariki – ‘eyes of god’ (mata ariki) or ‘little eyes’ (mata riki). According to legend, when Ranginui (sky father) and Papatūānuku (earth mother) were separated by their children, the god of the winds, Tāwhirimātea, became so angry that he tore out his eyes and threw them into the heavens.

Order Matariki and Puanga posters using the online form.

Two posters are available free of charge to support Matariki celebrations in your community:matariki

  1. Me aro ki te hē o Papatūānuku – respect mother earth, for it is the land that which sustains us
  2. Takoha, koha kai – make your contribution one of healthy kai

Why not celebrate Matariki by sharing a meal with friends, family and whānau?

Here are some of our favourite meal ideas:

http://www.breakfast-eaters.org.nz/content/matariki

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About backyardbooks

This blog is a kind of electronic storage locker for ideas and quotes that inform my research... literary research into fiction for young adults (with a special focus on New Zealand fiction). Kiwis are producing amazing literature for younger readers, but it isn't getting the academic appreciation it deserves. I hope readers of this blog can make use of the material I gather and share by way of promoting our fiction. Cheers!
This entry was posted in education around food and meals, Metaphors and Narratives around children and learners, Mono- Bi- and Multi-culturalism and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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